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Posts tagged as “Bankruptcy”

7th Cir. Reverses Denial of Bankruptcy Trustee’s Action to Recover Money Paid to Debt Collector

In a bankruptcy trustee's adversary action to recover money paid to a collection agency within 90 days prior to the filing of the debtor's bankruptcy petition, and pursuant to a previous garnishment order, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently reversed the ruling of a trial court denying the trustee's application.

2nd Cir. Holds FCRA Does Not Apply to Inaccuracies Involving Legal Disputes

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently affirmed a trial court’s order granting summary judgment in favor of a credit reporting agency and ruled that reporting a student loan debt that was discharged in bankruptcy as “due and owing” is not cognizable as an “inaccuracy” under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

3rd Cir. Excludes Home from Bankruptcy When Seller in Installment Sale Contract Obtained Possession Pre-Petition

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit recently held that, because the home seller in an installment sale contract received a judgment of possession before the buyer filed for bankruptcy, the home was not part of the buyer’s bankruptcy estate.

4th Cir. Vacates Bankruptcy Civil Contempt Order Against Creditor, Holds Taggart Standard Applies  

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that the "no fair ground of doubt" standard established by the Supreme Court of the United States in Taggart v. Lorenzen, a case involving alleged violation of a Chapter 7 discharge order, governed civil contempt proceedings for violation of a confirmed reorganization plan under Chapter 11.

7th Cir. Finds Standing on FCRA Privacy Claim, Tosses Case for Lack of Willful Violation or Damages

Federal courts have recently dismissed a number of cases brought by consumers alleging violations of consumer protection law because they lack “standing.” The trend has been hastened by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last year in TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez, a case involving the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

7th Cir. Rejects Borrower’s Attempt to Appeal Remand Order and Related Fee Award

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently affirmed the dismissal of several actions by a borrower against a mortgagee, and in so ruling also held that it did not have jurisdiction to review the lower court’s remand order, and that the borrower had waived his right to challenge an award of attorney fees and costs in connection with the remand.