Press "Enter" to skip to content

9th Cir. Affirms Dismissal of TILA Claims as Barred by FIRREA

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently affirmed the dismissal of a consumer’s Truth in Lending Act (TILA) claim for lack of subject matter jurisdiction, holding that the claim was barred by the jurisdiction-stripping provision of the federal Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act (FIRREA).

1st Cir. Upholds Dismissal of Mass. 93A Claims Against Mortgagee and Servicer As Time-Barred

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit recently affirmed the trial court’s dismissal of a consumer’s claims against the owner and loan servicer of her mortgage loan that their collection statements supposedly violated the Massachusetts Consumer Protection Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 93A, and the Massachusetts Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 93, 49.

5th Cir. Holds SCRA Does Not Apply to Louisiana Confessions of Judgment

In a case of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit recently held that the protections against default judgment under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) do not apply to the seizure and sale of real property in in rem proceedings under Louisiana law where the debtors have agreed to a confession of judgment in the mortgage or security agreement.

What is ‘Abusive’ Conduct Under Dodd-Frank? CFPB Provides an Answer by Issuing Its Policy on Abusive Acts and Practices

Following its enaction, the Dodd-Frank Act left the financial services industry with uncertainty in many areas. For nearly 10 years, the industry has wondered and speculated about the inclusion of a prohibition against abusive acts and practices.  What exactly is abusive conduct? Is abusive conduct different from false and misleading acts or unfairness? How will the CFPB handle enforcement?

And They’re Off! Multiple States Charging Ahead With Privacy Legislation    

As California Attorney General Xavier Becerra advises consumers of all their new rights under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), multiple states are introducing their own privacy acts, some of which are remarkably similar to the CCPA.  The most-watched privacy legislation is perhaps in Washington State, described below, which very nearly passed its Privacy Act last year.

6th Cir. Holds Consumer Lacks Standing to Assert ‘Meaningful Involvement’ Claim, Not Every Technical Violation is Redressable

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit recently affirmed a district court’s finding that a consumer lacked standing to pursue a lawsuit alleging that collection notices sent by a law firm violated the FDCPA because no attorney with the firm conducted a meaningful review of his debts.