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Posts tagged as “Fourth Circuit”

4th Cir. Holds Non-Mortgage Office Was Not ‘Branch Office’ Under HUD F2F Rule

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that a mortgagee’s office that was located within 200 miles of the mortgaged property, but did not conduct any mortgage-related business, was not a “branch office” of a “mortgagee” under the HUD rule requiring a face-to-face meeting with mortgage borrowers before filing a mortgage foreclosure action unless the mortgagee does not have a branch office within 200 miles of the borrower's home.

4th Cir. Holds FCRA Furnisher Liability Claim Not Viable Against Federal Gov’t

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that a trial court lacked jurisdiction over a claim for violation of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act involving a student loan administered by the U.S. Department of Education because Congress did not waive sovereign immunity for suits under FCRA. A copy of the opinion in Robinson v. U.S. Department of Education is available at:  Link to Opinion. This appeal arose from the plaintiff’s claim that the government agency responsible for administering the federal student loan program violated FCRA, 15 U.S.C. § 1681, et seq. The plaintiff alleged that the government…

4th Cir. Holds Tax Payment Agreement Subject to TILA and EFTA, Plaintiff Had Spokeo Standing

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that a tax payment agreement entered into pursuant to Virginia Code section 58.1-3018 was a consumer credit transaction subject to the federal Truth in Lending Act and Electronic Funds Transfer Act. The Court further ruled that the plaintiff had standing to assert his EFTA claim, because the claim was not merely for “a bare procedural violation,” but instead alleged “a substantive violation of the rights conferred by EFTA.” Accordingly, the Fourth Circuit affirmed the trial court’s denial of the company’s motion to dismiss the TILA and EFTA claims. A copy…

4th Cir. Holds Data Breach Victims Have Standing When Fraudulent Accounts Opened

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently vacated a judgment of dismissal in consolidated class actions arising from a data breach of personal information, holding that the plaintiffs had standing to sue because fraudulent credit cards were actually opened in the victims’ names. In so ruling, the Court distinguished its 2017 ruling in Beck v. McDonald, which held “a mere compromise of personal information, without more, fails to satisfy the injury-in-fact element in the absence of an identity theft.” A copy of the opinion in Rhonda Hutton v. National Board of Examiners is available at:  Link to…

4th Cir. Holds HPA Does Not Require LPMI Disclosures If LPMI Not Required at Closing

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently concluded that lender-paid mortgage insurance (“LPMI”) disclosures under the federal Homeowners Protection Act are only required if LPMI is a condition of the borrower obtaining the loan. In affirming the trial court’s dismissal of the borrowers’ claims, the Fourth Circuit dissected the specific language of the provision in the HPA addressing disclosures related to mortgage insurance, 12 U.S.C. § 4905.  Specifically, the Fourth Circuit determined that the disclosures are only required if LPMI is a condition of the loan at the time of closing. In this case, the lender did not…

4th Cir. Allows Chapter 13 Lien Stripping When No Proof of Claim Filed

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that a completely unsecured lien may be stripped off in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding under 11 U.S.C. § 1322(b) even though a proof of claim has not been filed. A copy of the opinion in Edwin Burkhart v. Nancy Spencer Grigsby is available at:  Link to Opinion. Debtors filed a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition in 2012.  At the time, the debtors’ principal residence was valued at $435,000 and encumbered by four liens. Creditor 1 held the mortgage lien with the highest priority in the amount due of $609,500.  Creditor 2’s two…

4th Cir. Holds Defendant Must Present Sufficient Evidence to ‘Determine – Not Speculate’ as to CAFA’s Requirements

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that a defendant invoking jurisdiction under the federal Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA), 28 U.S.C. § 1332(d), must provide sufficient evidence to allow the court to determine – not speculate – that it was more likely than not that there were at least 100 class members and the aggregate amount in controversy exceeded $5 million. A copy of the opinion in Scott v. Cricket Communications, LLC is available at:  Link to Opinion. Between July 2013 and March 2014, a consumer purchased two Samsung Galaxy S4 cell phones from the defendant…

4th Cir. Holds SCRA Does Not Apply to Mortgage Loan Incurred During Service, Even If Borrower Re-Enlists

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently held that the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) does not apply to a mortgage loan obligation incurred while a borrower is a member of the military, even where he subsequently leaves and then later re-enlists in the military prior to a foreclosure sale. A copy of the opinion in Sibert v. Wells Fargo Bank, NA is available at:  Link to Opinion. The borrower obtained a mortgage loan to purchase his home from the lender while he was serving in the U.S. Navy.  After his discharge from the Navy, the borrower…

4th Cir. Vacates $11M FCRA Class Action Judgment Citing Spokeo

Relying on Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins, 136 S. Ct. 1540 (2016), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit recently vacated and remanded for dismissal a trial court’s summary judgment ruling in favor of the plaintiff in an $11 million, 69,000 member class action under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), 15 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq., where the defendant credit reporting agency listed the name of a defunct credit card issuer instead of the name of the servicer as the source of information on the plaintiff’s credit report. In so ruling, the Fourth Circuit held that the…

4th Cir. Holds Entire Arbitration Agreement Unenforceable Due to Faulty Choice of Law Provisions

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that a creditor’s arbitration agreement contained unenforceable choice of law provisions rendering the entire agreement unenforceable. Accordingly, the Fourth Circuit affirmed the trial court’s order denying the creditor’s motion to compel arbitration. A copy of the opinion in James Dillon v. BMO Harris Bank, N.A. is available at:  Link to Opinion. The borrower applied for and received a “payday loan” through the lender’s website.  The lender was wholly owned by a Native American tribe. To complete the loan transaction, the borrower was required to sign an agreement containing a choice…