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Posts published in “FDCPA”

Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

7th Cir. Holds Collection Letter Properly Identified ‘Original’ and ‘Current’ Creditors Under FDCPA

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently affirmed judgment in favor of a debt buyer and debt collector against a consumer debtor alleging that the collector’s debt collection letter violated the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

2019: A Watershed Year for Consumer Financial Services Law

It has been an extraordinary 365 days for consumer financial services law. I cannot recall a year where so many states introduced legislation or proposed regulations or rules impacting the credit industry. At the federal level, proposed rules for the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act were (finally) released and California also proposed regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act.

9th Cir. Rules Letter’s ‘Benefits’ of Paying Time-Barred Debt Not Misleading Under FDCPA, CFPB to Address SOL Disclosures

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently held that a collection letter offering payment options on a time-barred debt and listing “benefits” of paying the debt was not deceptive or misleading under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Meanwhile, the CFPB is expected to take up the issue of time-barred debt disclosures early next year.

11th Cir. Adopts ‘False Name Exception’ to Creditor Liability Under FDCPA

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit recently reversed the dismissal of a pro se consumer’s claims under the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), holding that he stated a plausible claim for relief with his allegations that the defendant creditor obtained his credit report without his consent, and failed to reasonably investigate his credit reporting disputes. However, the Court affirmed the trial court’s dismissal of the consumer’s claim under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) that the creditor defendant used a “false name” in attempting to collect the debt owed to it.

Supreme Court: FDCPA Claims Run from Date of Violation – Not from Date of Discovery

There is no discovery rule for federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act claims, the U.S. Supreme Court held today. Affirming the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit's decision in Rotkiske v. Klemm, today’s opinion also overrules an earlier ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Mangum v. Action Collection Serv., Inc. There, the Ninth Circuit permitted FDCPA claims to run from when the plaintiff knows or has reason to know of the violation.

7th Cir. Reverses Dismissal of FDCPA Claim Involving Statement That 1099C Form May Be Filed

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently reversed the dismissal of a debtor’s claim under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, holding that the debtor stated a plausible claim that the dunning letter she received violated the FDCPA. Here, the Court held that the dunning letter at issue implied that the debt collector would file a 1099C form with the Internal Revenue Service, when in reality it was clear to the Seventh Circuit that the creditor would never file a 1099C form because the amount in each letter was less than $600.

OCC and FDIC Issue NPRMs to Fix Madden, and Clarify the Validity of the ‘Valid When Made’ Doctrine

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) both recently issued proposed rules to “fix” the potential problems arising from the ruling in Madden v. Midland Funding, LLC, 786 F.3d 246 (2nd Cir. 2015), which called into question the “valid when made” doctrine. In addition, the FDIC’s proposal would make clear that the permissible interest on a loan would be determined at the time the loan is made, regardless of subsequent events such as changes in state law or the sale or assignment of the loan. The OCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is available…

11th Cir. Reverses Denial of Class Cert in Challenge to Post-Discharge Mortgage Statements

In a putative class action of borrowers who received mortgage statements after a bankruptcy discharge, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit recently reversed a trial court order denying certification for failure to establish predominance. In so ruling, the Eleventh Circuit held that a mortgage servicer’s affirmative defense that it is not liable under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), 15 U.S.C. § 1692 et seq., and the Florida Consumer Collection Practices Act (FCCPA), Fla. Stat. § 559.55 et seq., because the only remedy for violating a discharge injunction is under the Bankruptcy Code requires no…

3rd Cir. Holds QR Code on Envelope Violates FDCPA

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit recently held that a debt collector violated the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) when the envelope it sent to a debtor displayed an unencrypted code that revealed the debtor’s account number when scanned. A copy of the opinion in DiNaples v. MRS BPO, LLC is available at:  Link to Opinion. A consumer defaulted on her credit card and the bank that issued it assigned the account to a debt collection agency. The debt collector sent the consumer “a collection letter as a pressure-sealed envelope that had a QR [or…

7th Cir. Holds No FDCPA Claim Where Consumer Failed to Prove Credit Card Transactions Were for ‘Consumer’ Purposes

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently affirmed judgment in favor of two debt collectors and against a debtor for his claims arising under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and the Wisconsin Consumer Act (WCA).  In so ruling, the Court held that the debtor did not create a triable issue of material fact to overcome summary judgment because he failed to present sufficient evidence that the transactions comprising the credit card debt on the underlying account were for “personal, family, or household purposes,” and therefore that the debt was a “consumer debt” subject to…

Emails and Hyperlink Delivery of FDCPA Disclosures after Lavallee

Lavallee v. Med-1 Solutions, LLC  from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit examines whether an email from a debt collector was an “initial communication” and if it was, whether a clickable hyperlink serves as a proper means of providing the validation notice mandated by section 1692g(a) of the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. These disclosures, sometimes called the “validation notice,” can be contained in what the FDCPA refers to as the “initial communication” or provided “in writing” within five days of the initial communication. While the debt collector was found to have violated the FDCPA, the decision…

2nd Cir. Holds FDCPA’s SOL Starts When Plaintiff is ‘Injured’

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently affirmed the dismissal of a claim under the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act holding that an FDCPA violation occurs, for the purposes of the FDCPA’s one year statute of limitations, when an individual is injured by the alleged unlawful conduct. In so ruling, the Second Circuit clarified that in Benzemann v. Citibank N.A., 806 F.3d 98 (2d Cir. 2015), it did not intend to expand the FDCPA’s statute of limitations by requiring individuals to be injured and receive “notice of the FDCPA violation.” A copy of the opinion in Benzemann…